McDonald’s serving up ‘restructured meat technology’ – you want fries with that?

Natural News

Well, it’s that time of year again when McDonald’s rolls out its venerable McRib sandwich. Tens of millions of Americans will purchase one – or, judging by the nation’s ever-widening belt line, several – but most will do so without knowing all they should know about this popular sandwich.

Besides high caloric content, there are several other reasons why you should avoid the McRib, a boneless pork product smothered in BBQ sauce that famously resembles a rack of ribs, as much as you avoid most of the other “delicacies” served by this fast-food behemoth. In addition, The Blaze reports, there are several “fun facts” about the sandwich you may not have known:

A sandwich ‘built’ from scratch?: The McRib is a product of Rene Arend, who came up with the idea and design of the sandwich. That said, Richard Mandigo, a professor from the University of Nebraska, who developed the “restructured meat product” that the McRib is actually made of.

According to Chicago magazine, citing a 1995 article by Mandigo, “restructured meat product” is described thusly:

Restructured meat products are commonly manufactured by using lower-valued meat trimmings reduced in size by comminution (flaking, chunking, grinding, chopping or slicing). The comminuted meat mixture is mixed with salt and water to extract salt-soluble proteins. These extracted proteins are critical to produce a “glue” which binds muscle pieces together. These muscle pieces may then be reformed to produce a “meat log” of specific form or shape. The log is then cut into steaks or chops which, when cooked, are similar in appearance and texture to their intact muscle counterparts. … Such products as tripe, heart, and scalded stomachs are high in protein, completely edible, wholesome, and nutritious, and most are already used in sausage without objection.

Still hungry?

Packed with calories – and ingredients: In a time of labeling, when government entities and the public are pushing for more disclosure, the package for the McRib would have to grow just to list all of its ingredients.

According to the current box labeling, the sandwich consists of just five basic components – a pork patty and BBQ sauce with pickle slices, onions and a sesame bun.

But, as Time magazine points out, a closer examination of McDonald’s own list of ingredients reveals that the sandwich contains a total of 70 ingredients, including azodicarbonamide, a flour-bleaching component that is often used to produce foamed plastics (think gym mats and the soles of shoes). In fact, “the compound is banned in Europe and Australia as a food additive,” says Time. Other ingredients include ammonium sulfate and polysorbate 80.

Besides, the sandwich itself contains an incredible amount of calories – 500 at least – along with 26 grams of fat, 44 grams of carbohydrates and 980 milligrams of sodium, nearly half the recommended daily amount of about 2,400 milligrams.

Not a good choice for your heart: The ingredients, combined with a dose of 10 mg of saturated fat (nearly half of the recommended daily allowance), make the McRib an enemy of a healthy heart, say the experts.

“Think about that for a second: When you eat a McRib, you’re eating the same chemical ingredients and compounds in those disgusting yoga mats at the gym. And that’s on top of the fact that it tastes terrible in the first place,” writes Rick Paulas, food editor for KCET, a public television network in southern California. “Which means it’s time to ask: Why are we still eating this?”

That’s a very valid question. In the meantime, that sound you hear is the further tightening of the nation’s belt line.

Fast Food America: Hospitals Serving Up McDonald’s to Patients

Natural Society

It is no surprise that fast food is extremely unhealthy. On one level, the processed junk food lacks essential vitamins and nutrients, while they are also concocted with numerous health-hazardous substances and chemicals which should not be found in food — let alone be eaten. Knowing this information, it is no wonder why you should avoid fast food at all costs. It is safe to say that no healthy individuals would or should be consuming fast food, and certainly no sick individuals who are depleted of nutrients (as a result of avoiding real food) should be consuming it either. So what in the world are fast food chains like McDonald’s doing in places like hospital cafeterias?

One common pun states that if you want to get sick you should go to a hospital, but the fact that fast food resides in these ‘health’ institutions lends even more truth to the humorous statement. It turns out that some hospitals, such as a hospital in Des Moines, think nothing of the fast food placement. Since 1988, the Des Moines hospital has been blessed by a McDonald’s fast food restaurant, and management seems to want no change.

As expected, the hospital has undergone much scrutiny for its decision to host a McDonald’s in its institution, with some of the disapproval coming from nation-wide junk food critic Corporate Accountability International. Asking the hospital to shut down the restaurant, the group said:

“Your hospital is being used as part of McDonald’s comprehensive marketing strategy, a strategy that is clearly inconsistent with your goals as a health institution”.

In response, hospital management said:

“[McDonald’s is] an alternative to visitors and family members to dine in a familiar environment that can be a comfort, particularly for children, during stressful times. McDonald’s offers a variety of choices, including healthy foods such as salads, and provides nutrition information for its patrons”.

McDonald’s salads, often pushed as a healthier alternative as portrayed above, contain two ingredients known as cilantro lime glaze and orange glaze. Within the glaze lies propylene glycol — a chemical that is not legal to use in cat food because its safety has not yet been proven to be safe. In addition, propylene glycol is also used ”as the killing and preserving agent in pitfall traps, usually used to capture ground beetles.” The salads also contain two ingredients that divulge the presence of MSG: disodium inosinate, and disodium guanylate.

McDonald’s Forced to Stop Using Ammonia-Tainted ‘Pink Slime’ in Meat

Natural Society, Feb. 3, 2012

McDonald’s has recently caved to consumer demands to cease the utilization of ‘pink slime’ scrap meat covered with ammonium hydroxide in their hamburgers and chicken sandwiches. The announcement highlights the fact that there are many health-crushing additives within the McDonald’s menu, and the reason that their hamburgers absolutely wreak havoc on your body actually has little to do with their high calorie and fat content. In fact, McDonald’s absolutely loves when health professionals neglect to mention the toxic ingredients hidden in their food.

The change was mostly made possible by Jamie Oliver, a celebrity chef who has recently gone on a campaign against the fast food giant. After heavily publicizing the fact that McDonald’s was using the ‘pink slime’ treated with ammonium hydroxide, food activists began to take action. However, the change does not mean that McDonald’s food choices are much better for you — in fact, they are still very damaging to your health. Oliver himself explains:

“Basically, we’re taking a product that would be sold at the cheapest form for dogs and after this process we can give it to humans,” said the TV chef.

Full story

McDonald’s and PepsiCo to help write UK health policy

    Eating a McDonald's burger Guardian
     
    The Department of Health is putting the fast food companies McDonald’s and KFC and processed food and drink manufacturers such as PepsiCo, Kellogg’s, Unilever, Mars and Diageo at the heart of writing government policy on obesity, alcohol and diet-related disease, the Guardian has learned.
    In an overhaul of public health, said by campaign groups to be the equivalent of handing smoking policy over to the tobacco industry, health secretary Andrew Lansley has set up five “responsibility deal” networks with business, co-chaired by ministers, to come up with policies. Some of these are expected to be used in the public health white paper due in the next month.