FDA Approves GMO Apples And Potatoes

Modern Farmer

Amazing non-browning GMO apples and potatoes from two different companies have officially passed FDA inspection. They are as safe and nutritious as non-modified versions, says the agency. Will customers agree?

When people think of genetically modified foods (or GMOs, the O standing for organisms), a common thought is of beastly, unnatural items: basketball-sized fruits that won’t spoil, pigs with chicken hearts, who knows! Scary stuff! But typically the real reasons to go into the DNA are much more mundane. Take the six new types of GMO potatoes and two new types of GMO apples that the FDA approved for consumption [in mid-March of this year]: they look just like regular produce! Except they won’t brown after you cut them.

Arctic Apple, which we’ve covered before, is the brand name for the two varieties of apple that have just been approved. You’ll be able to get either a Granny Smith or a Golden Delicious version, both of which have been modified to remove the enzyme that turns an apple brown after it’s been exposed to oxygen in the air. The enormous agribusiness corporation J.R. Simplot is responsible for the potatoes, which will be marketed under the name Innate and have been modified in a similar way—except with the addition of reducing acrylamide, a substance that shows up when you fry potatoes for chips or french fries and that may cause cancer (nobody’s quite sure yet).

The FDA is generally pro-, or at least not anti-GMO, and noted in Friday’s announcement that “people have been modifying plants for thousands of years through breeding and selection.” The agency also stated that after researching the new apples and potatoes, they are confident in stating that the produce is “as safe and nutritious as their conventional counterparts.” That means they’re safe to sell, though it’ll be up to the states to regulate further (Vermont, for example, wants mandatory labeling on all GMO products.)

The debate over GMOs isn’t likely to end with this announcement, but it does mark a new chapter: these are easy-to-understand modifications, and they’ll be available on store shelves. Whether people will buy them is yet to be seen.

Genetically Modified Salmon Approval Pushed by USDA with Nearly $500,000 Funding

WarOnYou.com, Nov. 16, 2011

In September of 2010, a new genetically modified animal hybrid sparked mass concern as well as nationwide controversy.

The possibility of having genetically modified salmon for dinner did not sit well with many independent scientists, consumer groups, environmental organizations, and especially the healthy consumer.

Although the genetically modified salmon, commonly referred to as “frankenfish”, has not yet been approved for consumption, it seems that certain US organizations are determined to place the fish on your plate.

One can only wonder why an organization like the USDA would fund research to help the frankenfish’s approval while one part of the legislative branch of government shoots it down. The question is, what could possibly cause the USDA to fund Aquabounty while there is so much controversy surrounding the salmon on a government level? Why would the USDA, an organization which stamps organic products with their seal to indicate no use of genetic modification, give money to a company to research and ultimately sell genetically modified salmon? The answers are unclear, but the actions exhibited by the USDA could very well reflect the personal goals of the members. Perhaps USDA members could have vested interest in the approval of genetically modified fish.

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Controversial Author Anna Kavanaugh Shocks Readers: Opens Fire On On FDA, USDA and GMO Companies in New Trilogy

PRWeb, Sept. 14, 2011

Author Anna Kavanaugh had retired from her career as a novelist in 2008, but has this week made a shocking announcement of her return. Her resurfacing comes as a welcome surprise to dedicated fans who held out hope this day would come, and it has come in with a roar. In line with the author’s previous reputation in tackling the controversial, she is holding back no punches.

Altering DNA. Genetically modified human food sources. These are disturbing topics, one that few consumers fully understand and have stirred controversy since the USDA approved the growing of genetically modified foods and likewise, the FDA stamped approval on the sale of meat and dairy products from cloned animals and their offspring in 2008. Of no small matter either; the administration further ruled that no labels were necessary on such products sold to the public. The same controversy has similarly troubled consumers in Europe. These accepted practices, yet still suspiciously lacking in public disclosure regulation or consideration, span concerns across the board. Serious ethical, moral, spiritual, humane, and human health questions all arise, yet go unanswered.

Author Anna Kavanaugh is outraged and fearful of where our organic food supply is heading, and to what end. In her upcoming trilogy series, “The Cord of Callows” being three installment novels “Provenance”, “Creed” and “Covenant” the author opens fire on these practices and minces no words in describing her fears of the nightmare we may be imposing on future generations.

“It is incomprehensible to me that in this day and age we as people are stripped of our right to choose what we put into our bodies, and the bodies of our children.” Kavanaugh explains.

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