Brussels bureaucrats were ridiculed yesterday after banning drink manufacturers from claiming that water can prevent dehydration

Telegraph, Nov. 20, 2011

EU officials concluded that, following a three-year investigation, there was no evidence to prove the previously undisputed fact.

Producers of bottled water are now forbidden by law from making the claim and will face a two-year jail sentence if they defy the edict, which comes into force in the UK next month.

Last night, critics claimed the EU was at odds with both science and common sense. Conservative MEP Roger Helmer said: “This is stupidity writ large.

“The euro is burning, the EU is falling apart and yet here they are: highly-paid, highly-pensioned officials worrying about the obvious qualities of water and trying to deny us the right to say what is patently true.

“If ever there were an episode which demonstrates the folly of the great European project then this is it.”

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EFSA confirms access to 1980s aspartame data as it calls for fresh science

Foodnavigator.com, June 30, 2011

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has confirmed it has access to 112 studies about aspartame, most of which were conducted in the 1980s, which had been feared lost.The agency referenced the studies in issuing a public call for aspartame (E951) data that runs until September 30, this year and which it said will be, “the most thorough and up-to-date yet.”

“To complete its evaluation, EFSA is asking for all available scientific and technical data – published, unpublished and newly generated – related to aspartame in food and drinks and as a table-top sweetener,” it said in a statement.

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Related: EFSA intense sweeteners opinion lacks ‘common sense’, says Ajinomoto [Excerpt: The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) article 13, general function opinion delivered yesterday found replacing sugars with intense sweeteners does not contribute to the maintenance or achievement of a normal body weight or normal blood glucose concentrations.]

EFSA review dismisses artificial sweetener critics

Beverage Daily, Mar. 1, 2011

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reviewed two studies published last year: a carcinogenicity study in mice from the Ramazzini Institute (Soffritti et al., 2010) and an epidemiological study linking artificially-sweetened soft drinks to premature birth (Halldorsson et al., 2010).

Following a review conducted with the co-operation of the French food safety agency Anses, EFSA concluded that the studies “do not give reason to reconsider previous safety assessments of aspartame or of other sweeteners currently authorised in the European Union.”

EFSA said incidence of these tumours reported in the study fall within the historical control range. In addition, hepatic tumours in mice are not regarded by toxicologists as being relevant for human risk assessment when induced from substances like aspartame that do not damage DNA.

EFSA is requesting the complete data set from the Ramazzini Institute and said that as it stands it therefore cannot comment fully on the validity of the study, its statistical approach or results.

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Many studies with dubious funding sources (Anjinamoto, Searle, Merisont, etc.) will attest to the safety of aspartame. Non-industry funded studies may be found at this link: http://sweetremedy.tv/?page_id=1190 -Ed.