Pregnant Women’s Electromagnetic Exposure Linked to Children’s Asthma

Natural Society
by Susan Patterson

Mothers who are in close contact with electromagnetic fields while pregnant could have children with an increased risk of developing asthma, state U.S. scientists. Such devices examined in the study included microwaves ovens, hair dryers and vacuum cleaners.

The study conducted fits in with the ongoing debate as to the impact that long-term exposure to electromagnetic fields, such as power lines, vacuum cleaners, appliances and hair dryers, has on human health. Previous studies that have denied a relationship exists between electromagnetic exposure and health have not measured exposure directly but asked participants to estimate exposure.

Published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, scientists from Kaiser Permanente conducted a study that involved a group of 801 expecting women. The mothers-to-be were fitted with electromagnetic monitors that recorded the amount of low-frequency electromagnetic exposure they received over 24 hours.

Medical records were used to track the children of exposed mothers over a period of 13 years. The study revealed that almost 21 percent of the children had developed asthma; most by the time they were just 5 years old. When these results were compared against the mother’s exposure levels it was found that those who were within the highest amount of exposure were 3.5 times more likely to have a child with asthma than those in the lower exposure group. Children moderately exposed were at a 75% increased risk of asthma than those in the lowest exposure group.

Dr. De-Kun Li, senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California and other researchers suspect that electromagnetic fields, which have previously been linked to an increase in miscarriages, may affect immune response, which can trigger the development of asthma. At the least, states Li, this study suggests a need for further research into the issue.

Similar research revolving around the impact electromagnetic frequencies have on animals and humans found that exposure to these fields negatively alters important proteins found in the brain. The researchers found that 143 proteins in the brain were negatively impacted by radio frequency radiation over a period of 8 months. A total of 3 hours of cell phone exposure were simulated over the 8 month time period, and the results showed that many neural function related proteins’ functional relationship changed the for worse.

About 13 percent of children under the age of 18 have asthma, a condition that is caused by a malfunction of the immune system and the respiratory organs. Asthma is often treated with harsh pharmaceutical drugs that were found to actually kill more people each year than asthma alone, but safer solutions – such as minimizing exposure to electromagnetic chaos – do exist.

Related:  Cell Phones, EMF Negatively Altering Important Regions of the Brain

Pylons linked to babies’ asthma: Hairdryers, vacuum cleaners and microwave also a risk, say scientists

Daily Mail, Aug. 1, 2011

Pregnant women who use hairdryers, microwaves, vacuum cleaners or who live near pylons could be putting their babies at risk of asthma, claim scientists.

They warn that exposing unborn children to potentially harmful magnetic energy produced by household appliances and power lines could treble their child’s chances of suffering from the condition.

Experts believe that the finding could partly explain why asthma rates in children have increased so dramatically in the last few decades.

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Wi-Fi Makes Trees Sick, Study Says

PCWorld, Nov. 19, 2010

Radiation from Wi-Fi networks is harmful to trees, causing significant variations in growth, as well as bleeding and fissures in the bark, according to a recent study in the Netherlands.

Besides the electromagnetic fields created by mobile-phone networks and wireless LANs, ultrafine particles emitted by cars and trucks may also be to blame. These particles are so small they are able to enter the organisms.

The study exposed 20 ash trees to various radiation sources for a period of three months. Trees placed closest to the Wi-Fi radio demonstrated a “lead-like shine” on their leaves that was caused by the dying of the upper and lower epidermis of the leaves. This would eventually result in the death of parts of the leaves. The study also found that Wi-Fi radiation could inhibit the growth of corn cobs.

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