Hydrolysed vegetable proteins – Food safety & quality

Imagesfood.com, Sept. 23, 2011

The consumption of various food additives has been growing steadily around the world since the mid-20th century… Seasonings containing hydrolysed vegetable proteins (HVP) hold a very important place among widely used food additives.

Hydrolysed Vegetable Protein-HVP (sometimes referred to as Hydrolysed Plant Protein) is widely used in the food industry as a savoury flavouring agent to bring out the natural flavours in food. A chemical process called acid hydrolysis breaks down protein into amino acids from various food sources…Many foods contain HVP, including processed foods such as bouillon, soup, sauce mixes, gravy, crackers, chips, instant soups, processed meat and frankfurters. HVP is also produced via enzymatic hydrolysis.

The acid hydrolysis technology can result in the production of the so-called toxic glycerol chlorohydrins (MCPD and DCP). 3-MCPD may be formed as a result of a reaction between a source of chlorine (e.g., Chlorinated water or salt) in the food or a food contact material and a lipid source. This reaction is encouraged during the heat processing of foods. Chloropropanol is formed during those harsh hydrolysis conditions: fats present in the protein source do also hydrolyse in three fatty acid chains and glycerol.

3-MCPD has been shown to be a carcinogen in laboratory animal studies and the European Commission’s Scientific Committee on Food (SCF) originally classified 3-MCPD as a genotoxic carcinogen with the recommendation that its presence in foodstuffs should be reduced to an undetectable level.

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‘Four in 10’ face ordeal of cancer

The Independent, July 14, 2011

Rising cancer rates mean that more than four in 10 Britons will be diagnosed with the disease at some point in their lives, according to a study by a leading health charity.

New figures obtained by Macmillan Cancer Support show that 42% of Britons who die have had cancer – compared to around 35% a decade ago.

The study, which analysed data from 2008, also revealed that 64% of cancer sufferers will eventually die from the disease.

Ciaran Devane, chief executive of Macmillan Cancer Support, said: “It is really alarming that the number of people who will get cancer is now well past one in three, and that there are so many more people with cancer today than even 10 years ago.”

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Cellphones a ‘possible’ carcinogen — like coffee

AP, May 31, 2011

LONDON – A respected international panel of scientists says cellphones are possible cancer-causing agents, putting them in the same category as the pesticide DDT, gasoline engine exhaust and coffee.

The classification was issued Tuesday in Lyon, France, by the International Agency for Research on Cancer after a review of dozens of published studies. The agency is an arm of the World Health Organization and its assessment now goes to WHO and national health agencies for possible guidance on cellphone use.

Classifying agents as “possibly carcinogenic” doesn’t mean they automatically cause cancer and some experts said the ruling shouldn’t change people’s cellphone habits.
“Anything is a possible carcinogen,” said Donald Berry, a professor of biostatistics at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas. He was not involved in the WHO cancer group’s assessment. “This is not something I worry about and it will not in any way change how I use my cellphone,” he said — speaking from his cellphone.Full story

EFSA review dismisses artificial sweetener critics

Beverage Daily, Mar. 1, 2011

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reviewed two studies published last year: a carcinogenicity study in mice from the Ramazzini Institute (Soffritti et al., 2010) and an epidemiological study linking artificially-sweetened soft drinks to premature birth (Halldorsson et al., 2010).

Following a review conducted with the co-operation of the French food safety agency Anses, EFSA concluded that the studies “do not give reason to reconsider previous safety assessments of aspartame or of other sweeteners currently authorised in the European Union.”

EFSA said incidence of these tumours reported in the study fall within the historical control range. In addition, hepatic tumours in mice are not regarded by toxicologists as being relevant for human risk assessment when induced from substances like aspartame that do not damage DNA.

EFSA is requesting the complete data set from the Ramazzini Institute and said that as it stands it therefore cannot comment fully on the validity of the study, its statistical approach or results.

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Many studies with dubious funding sources (Anjinamoto, Searle, Merisont, etc.) will attest to the safety of aspartame. Non-industry funded studies may be found at this link: http://sweetremedy.tv/?page_id=1190 -Ed.

Methyl iodide’s use in state challenged by suit

San Francisco Chronicle, Jan.4, 2010

Environmentalists and farmworkers challenged approval of a toxic fumigant and carcinogen for use on California crops Monday and urged Gov. Jerry Brown to reverse the decision.

The coalition of advocacy groups filed a lawsuit Thursday calling the decision to register methyl iodide as a pesticide “irresponsible and illegal.”

The chemical, produced by Arysta Life- Science Corp. primarily for use on strawberry fields, was approved by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation last month despite concern from some scientists, toxicologists and environmentalists. The lawsuit claims methyl iodide is a poison that causes cancer and thyroid disease and can harm the lungs, liver, kidneys, brain and central nervous system.

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