Scientists Say Delay Breastfeeding to ‘Improve’ Vaccine Potency

Natural Society, Jan. 20, 2012

Scientists are now recommending that mothers delay vital breastfeeding in order to ‘improve’ the effects of vaccinations, stating that consuming breast milk could hamper the potency of vaccinations such as the rotavirus injection. The authors state that the immune-boosting effects of breast milk could negatively affect the vaccine potency. Of course the authors make no mention of the relationship between vaccination and over 189 diseases as observed by peer-reviewed research.

In a study published in the Journal of Pediatric Infections & Diseases that anyone can freely read, scientists say that breastfeeding should be halted to improve vaccine effects (which include negative effects).

The advisory is specifically targeted towards developing and poor nations, as is the norm with massive vaccination campaigns funded by the likes of the Bill Gates Foundation and the United Nations. Perhaps most startling is the fact that children in these nations oftentimes rely on breast milk as the only source of quality nutrition, yet the recommendation states that this is a desirable effect. In fact, a weakened immune system is just what the scientists are looking for to increase the potency and ‘effectiveness’ of the vaccine.

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It’s not all white: The cocktail of up to 20 chemicals in a glass of milk

Daily Mail, June 7, 2011

A glass of milk can contain a cocktail of up to 20 painkillers, antibiotics and growth hormones, scientists have shown.

Using a highly sensitive test, they found a host of chemicals used to treat illnesses in animals and people in samples of cow, goat and human breast milk.

The Spanish-Moroccan team analysed 20 samples of cow’s milk bought in Spain and Morocco, along with samples of goat and breast milk.

Their breakdown, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, revealed that cow’s milk contained traces of anti-inflammatory drugs niflumic acid, mefenamic acid and ketoprofen – commonly used as painkillers in animals and people.

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