Top Food Additives You Really Need to Avoid

Technorati.com, Dec. 27, 2010

The vast majorities of processed foods are packed with calories and have been stripped of any nutrients that we require to maintain optimal health. Over the course of years and decades, the lack of vitamins and minerals from natural foods slowly leads to chronic disease conditions such as diabetes, cancer, dementia and heart disease.

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Monsanto is the real food terror threat

CAIndependentVoterNetwork, Dec. 24 2010
Mary Nash Stoddard of the Aspartame Consumer Safety Network informs us: “In 1998, Monsanto applied for FDA approval for a monster molecule, “based on the aspartame formula” with one critical addition: 3-dimethylbutyl [listed on EPA’s most hazardous chemical list]. Neotame is touted as being 13,000 times sweeter than sugar.

On July 5 2002, Monsanto’s Neotame molecule was approved by the US FDA over formally registered objections of the Aspartame Consumer Safety Network and others. Long term effects on humans are unknown.

The food labeling requirements for aspartame have now been dropped for Neotame, and no one is clear why this was allowed to happen.
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Soda companies pushed pop as beneficial beverage for infants

Natural News, Nov. 26, 2010

For over a hundred years, soda companies been selling products with ingredients that we now know are linked to diabetes, obesity, gout and kidney stones. Those are some of the effects of the High Fructose Corn Syrup and phosphoric acid found in conventional sodas, and we haven’t even mentioned the health problems caused by aspartame.

And yet, despite the fact that these soda products are demonstrably harmful to human health, the soda industry has been working hard for many decades to convince parents to feed their infants and children more soda.

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Aspartame Causes Premature Births

Natural News

(NaturalNews) Regular consumption of artificial sweeteners by pregnant women may increase their risk of premature birth, according to a study funded by the European Union and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Researchers interviewed almost 60,000 pregnant Danish women about their soft-drink consumption, then compared these data with the results of the women’s births. They found that drinking one can of diet soda per day increased her risk of giving birth prematurely by 38 percent compared with women who never drank diet soda. Drinking four or more of the beverages per day increased the risk of preterm birth by 78 percent.

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