Radiation level in tuna off Oregon coast tripled after Fukushima disaster

RT

While the state of Oregon gears up to test its shores for radioactive contamination from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster, university scientists have found that radiation levels in some albacore tuna caught off its coast have tripled.

According to researchers at the Oregon State University, the results came after tests analyzed the cesium levels in 26 tuna caught prior to the 2011 nuclear calamity – as far back as 2008 – and those caught after the accident.

Although the levels of radioactive isotopes in some of the tuna tripled after the disaster, the researchers found they are still “a thousand times lower” than the safety standards outlined by the US Department of Agriculture.

“A year of eating albacore with these cesium traces is about the same dose of radiation as you get from spending 23 seconds in a stuffy basement from radon gas,” the study’s lead author, Delvan Neville said to Oregon’s Statesman Journal.

Still, Neville added that the discovery of any amount of radiation is significant.

“You can’t say there is absolutely zero risk because any radiation is assumed to carry at least some small risk,” he said. “But these trace levels are too small to be a realistic concern.”

Researchers stated that the migration paths of the tuna could also affect the levels of radiation going forward. Most of the 3-year-old tuna tested had no traces of Fukushima radiation, but 4-year-old tuna – which likely traveled through the radioactive plume a couple of times – had higher cesium levels. Continued migration could increase cesium levels further, but the researchers said it would still fall well below maximum safety levels.

Since the results did reveal a spike in radiation, though, the researchers will be expanding their study beyond Oregon to test a larger number of tuna across the West Coast.

“The presence of these radioactive isotopes is actually helping us in an odd way – giving us information that will allow us to estimate how albacore tuna migrate between our West Coast and Japan,” Neville told the Journal.

Meanwhile, Oregon state itself plans to hold its next quarterly radiation test on May 13. Back in February, Ken Buesseler of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution stated that a plume of radioactive water from Fukushima would likely hit the US West Coast by April 2014. Buesseler said the plume is likely too diluted to pose a health concern to Americans or the habitat, but added that only testing will be able to confirm his belief.

Fukushima: California rainwater manifests radiation poison symptoms

The Canadian

The Fukushima Nuclear disaster changed people’s perspective of nuclear energy. It even forced some countries to stop pursuing Nuclear Energy, like in the case of Italy. It reminded the people of the infamous Chernobyl incident.

The tragedy also inspired many social activists in countries like India to protest against the setting up of new Nuclear Plants. However, the problems caused by this incident do not end there.

Recently, there have been concerns that the radiation released from the two nuclear plants at Fukushima has reached the state of California in the US. Even the Environmental Protection Agency has reported finding elevated levels of iodine-131, a product of nuclear fission, in rainwater in the states of California, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. The levels exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) permitted in drinking water.

Many external agencies have detected high levels of radiations in food items, clothes, and even the sea water in the West Coast of the US. Researchers have even found that many of the sea animals have been affected by radiation poisoning.

An article published in Rense.com talks about how a dead sea lion, which was found lying in the Southern California Coast, was discovered to be radioactive. The article tells us the alarming level of radiation detected in its remains.

“A quick scan with a dosimeter revealed that the sea lion was radioactive. More careful measurements disclosed a shocking 0.48 microsieverts in the heart and liver region. The second most affected area was its rear flippers, probably due to repeated contact with fecal excretions. The nose and mouth were a bit less contaminated.”

Even websites like Enviroreporter.com have talked about the high level of radiation in air and water, including rain water. According to the website,

Over 2,374 tests since March 2011 have yielded high radiation detection in water, air as well as food and drink. Hot rain measurements in California have also yielded similar results.

Being exposed to radiation can result in a variety of health problems and complications, including cancer and organ damage. Even though the officials maintain that there is no serious risk to the health of the people, many people have reported symptoms like nausea, itching and skin reddening etc. which are the symptoms of radiation poisoning.

George Hemminger has posted a video on his official YouTube channel and in this video, he and his friend have suggested a few measures which can help people in staying safe. The video was streamed live on 24 April, 2013 through Google hangout.

Many of the users of social media have also expressed their concern about radiation poisoning.

Related:  California Slammed With Fukushima Radiation
Are tea, seaweed, fish oil, kelp & chlorella supplements grown in Asia….which most are, radioactive and contaminated with heavy metals?

Obama Approves Raising Permissible Levels of Nuclear Radiation in Drinking Water. Civilian Cancer Deaths Expected to Skyrocket

Global Research

The White House has given final approval for dramatically raising permissible radioactive levels in drinking water and soil following “radiological incidents,” such as nuclear power-plant accidents and dirty bombs. The final version, slated for Federal Register publication as soon as today, is a win for the nuclear industry which seeks what its proponents call a “new normal” for radiation exposure among the U.S population, according Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER).

Issued by the Environmental Protection Agency, the radiation guides (called Protective Action Guides or PAGs) allow cleanup many times more lax than anything EPA has ever before accepted. These guides govern evacuations, shelter-in-place orders, food restrictions and other actions following a wide range of “radiological emergencies.” The Obama administration blocked a version of these PAGs from going into effect during its first days in office. The version given approval late last Friday is substantially similar to those proposed under Bush but duck some of the most controversial aspects:

In soil, the PAGs allow long-term public exposure to radiation in amounts as high as 2,000 millirems. This would, in effect, increase a longstanding 1 in 10,000 person cancer rate to a rate of 1 in 23 persons exposed over a 30-year period;

In water, the PAGs punt on an exact new standard and EPA “continues to seek input on this.” But the thrust of the PAGs is to give on-site authorities much greater “flexibility” in setting aside established limits; and

Resolves an internal fight inside EPA between nuclear versus public health specialists in favor of the former. The PAGs are the product of Gina McCarthy, the assistant administrator for air and radiation whose nomination to serve as EPA Administrator is taken up this week by the Senate.

Despite the years-long internal fight, this is the first public official display of these guides. This takes place as Japan grapples with these same issues in the two years following its Fukushima nuclear disaster.

“This is a public health policy only Dr. Strangelove could embrace. If this typifies the environmental leadership we can expect from Ms. McCarthy, then EPA is in for a long, dirty slog,” stated PEER Executive Director Jeff Ruch, noting that the EPA package lacks a cogent rationale, is largely impenetrable and hinges on a series of euphemistic “weasel words.”

“No compelling justification is offered for increasing the cancer deaths of Americans innocently exposed to corporate miscalculations several hundred-fold.”

Reportedly, the PAGs had been approved last fall but their publication was held until after the presidential election. The rationale for timing their release right before McCarthy’s confirmation hearing is unclear.

Since the PAGs guide agency decision-making and do not formally set standards or repeal statutory requirements, such as the Safe Drinking Water Act and Superfund, they will go into full effect following a short public comment period. Nonetheless, the PAGs will likely determine what actions take place on the ground in the days, weeks, months and, in some cases, years following a radiological emergency.

Related:  Nuclear Radiation Levels from Fukushima Are RISING